Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Johne's Disease (Mycobacterium paratuberculosis) in a Jimela Topi (Damaliscus lunatus jimela)

Howard Steinberg
The Journal of Zoo Animal Medicine
Vol. 19, No. 1/2 (Mar. - Jun., 1988), pp. 33-41
DOI: 10.2307/20094850
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20094850
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Johne's Disease (Mycobacterium paratuberculosis) in a Jimela Topi (Damaliscus lunatus jimela)
Preview not available

Abstract

A 10-yr-old male Jimela topi (Damaliscus lunatus jimela) born in captivity was evaluated by Veterinary Services, San Diego Zoo. The animal had a history of weight loss in the presence of a good appetite, abdominal distension, and intermittent soft feces. Clinical evaluation revealed a marginal anemia, hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, a lymphocyte-neutrophil reversal, and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Radiographs, per rectal colonic biopsy, comparative intradermal tuberculin skin tests, and attempts to isolate Salmonella sp. and Campylobacter sp. were all negative. Fecal smears revealed abundant acid-fast bacilli. A diagnosis of Johne's disease was made and the animal was euthanized. Necropsy revealed an emaciated animal with a mildly thickened and hyperemic small intestine, cecum, and large intestine; lymphadenopathy of the colonic, intestinal, and mesenteric lymph nodes; and a mottled, soft friable liver. Histopathologic evaluation revealed chronic diffuse granulomatous inflammatory infiltrates in the small and large intestine, intra-abdominal lymph nodes, and hepatic peripheral lobular regions. There were abundant macrophages in all these tissues which contained large numbers of densely packed intracytoplasmic acid-fast bacilli. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was isolated from the fecal cultures. Because of the potential transmission of Johne's disease to two adult female and three juvenile topi cohabiting with the infected animal, all herd mates were euthanized. Serologic, comparative skin tests, histopathologic evaluation, and fecal examination failed to indicate the presence of mycobacterial organisms or disease in any of these animals.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41