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Tuberculosis in Newly Imported Tibetan Macaques (Macaca thibetans)

Donald L. Janssen, Marilyn P. Anderson, Susanne Abildgaard and Sam Silverman
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Vol. 20, No. 3, Infectious Diseases Issue (Sep., 1989), pp. 315-321
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20094967
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Tuberculosis in Newly Imported Tibetan Macaques (Macaca thibetans)
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Abstract

Six rare Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetans) arrived from a zoo in Asia for quarantine. One animal had a positive reaction to an intradermal palpebral tuberculin test using mammalian old tuberculin, and a second animal in the group converted 30 days after arrival. Comparative abdominal tuberculin tests showed minimal reactions. Thoracic radiographs were normal. Mycobacterial cultures taken from feces, gastric lavages, and tracheal washes were negative. While awaiting culture results, the two reactors were isolated from the other animals in quarantine. These two animals developed disseminated tuberculosis 5 mo after their arrival. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from one animal, and M. bovis was isolated from the other. One animal was euthanized because of suspicious masses seen on the thoracic radiographs. This animal did not have tuberculosis. The remaining three animals were isolated for 11 mo and treated with isoniazid for 4 mo. None of the three converted to positive tuberculin status. In these cases, tuberculin testing with mammalian old tuberculin at the palpebral site appeared to be the most sensitive indicator of early infection. In contrast, antemortem diagnostic techniques (i.e., comparative tuberculin testing, thoracic radiographs, and mycobacterial cultures) were ineffective in diagnosing tuberculosis prior to the presence of clinical disease.

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