Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Variation in Serum α-Tocopherol, Retinol, Cholesterol, and Selenium of Free-Ranging Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus)

Ellen S. Dierenfeld and David A. Jessup
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Vol. 21, No. 4 (Dec., 1990), pp. 425-432
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20095094
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Variation in Serum α-Tocopherol, Retinol, Cholesterol, and Selenium of Free-Ranging Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus)
Preview not available

Abstract

Serum α-tocopherol, retinol, cholesterol, and whole blood selenium levels were measured in 151 free-ranging mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from 14 locations in California. Data were compared by year (n = seven), season (n = four), age (n = three groups), migratory behavior, and sex. Herd mean α-tocopherol ranged from 0.8 to 4.2 μg/ml, with significantly higher levels in females versus males, migrators versus resident animals, and from samples collected in spring versus later in the year. Serum retinol varied from 0.19 to 0.46 μg/ml among herds; adults, females, and migratory deer had higher (P < 0.05) levels than appropriate comparison groups. Habitat influenced serum cholesterol more than other variables; α-tocopherol (μg/ml): cholesterol (mg/dl) ratios were consistently > 1.0. Selenium herd means ranged from 19.5 to 167.6 ng/ml; migratory animals had lower (P < 0.01) blood levels than residents. No significant correlations were observed among any of these measures, and stepwise regression analysis revealed no consistent prediction of deer body condition. Data suggest widely varying levels of vitamin E and other nutrients in natural diets consumed by mule deer. Such variability must be considered when assessing nutrient status from single blood samples.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
430
    430
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432