Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Safety and Physiologic Effects of the Anticoccidial Drugs Monensin and Clazuril in Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis)

James W. Carpenter, Meliton N. Novilla and Jeff S. Hatfield
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Vol. 23, No. 2 (Jun., 1992), pp. 214-221
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20095212
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Safety and Physiologic Effects of the Anticoccidial Drugs Monensin and Clazuril in Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis)
Preview not available

Abstract

Coccidia (Eimeria gruis and E. reichenowi) are common parasites of whooping (Grus americana) and sandhill (G. canadensis) cranes. Although Eimeria spp. infections are generally a disease of the intestinal tract, this parasite can become extraintestinal (disseminated visceral coccidiosis [DVC]) in cranes. In DVC, granulomatous nodules may form in many tissues and organs or may result in bronchopneumonia, hepatitis, myocarditis, splenitis, and enteritis. Because crane chick mortality from DVC at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center increased in 1988, suggesting that the parasite may be developing a resistance to the coccidiostat amprolium, a target animal safety study using two coccidiostats, monensin and clazuril, was conducted on 27 subadult sandhill cranes. Results of this study indicate that both monensin and clazuril are safe in cranes when administered at 1 ×, 2 ×, and 5 × the dosage approved for use in poultry.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221