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Hematology and Serum Chemistry Values for Free-Ranging Golden Crowned Sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli)

Della M. Garell and David M. Meyers
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Vol. 26, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 382-386
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20095494
Page Count: 5
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Hematology and Serum Chemistry Values for Free-Ranging Golden Crowned Sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli)
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Abstract

Thirty-four free-ranging golden crowned sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli) inhabiting three forest sites in northeastern Madagascar were immobilized for a collaborative ecologic, physiologic, and behavioral study. Physiologic reference values have not been determined for this recently described species. Blood samples taken opportunistically were evaluated for hematologic and serum chemistry values and for hemoparasites. Other than elevated aspartate aminotransferase and creatine phosphokinase levels, blood values were within reference ranges published for other prosimian primates. Evidence of circulating microfilariae was found in 59% of individuals sampled using the Knott's centrifugation technique. Adults had a significantly higher prevalence of microfilariasis than did juveniles (P < 0.001). No significant differences (P > 0.05) in total white blood cell count, percentage of eosinophils, or levels of alanine aminotransferase or alkaline phosphatase were found between individuals positive and negative for circulating microfilariae. No malarial parasites were observed on examination of thin blood smears. No enteric parasites were identified on fecal zinc sulfate flotation or on examination of direct fecal smears. External ear mites were observed in 48% of the sifaka examined. There was no evidence of external ear pathology.

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