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Journal Article

Immobilization of Free-Ranging African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus) Using a Ketamine/xylazine/Atropine Combination

Steven A. Osofsky, John W. McNutt and Karen J. Hirsch
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Vol. 27, No. 4 (Dec., 1996), pp. 528-532
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20095618
Page Count: 5

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Topics: Dogs, Dosage, Hydrochlorides, Zoos, Atropine, Heart rate, Anesthesia, Seals, Oxygen, Pulse oximetry
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Immobilization of Free-Ranging African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus) Using a Ketamine/xylazine/Atropine Combination
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Abstract

Five free-ranging adult African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus), 24-31 kg, were darted with 35-50 mg ketamine, 60 mg xylazine, and 1.25 mg atropine. Four of five immobilizations had no dart failures, with times to sternal recumbency between 9 and 13 min. Immobilized dogs exhibited complete skeletal muscle relaxation, and none exhibited any signs of arousal during physical examination or sampling. Continuous monitoring of pulse rate and percent oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (Spo₂) trends, in addition to other anesthesia monitoring procedures, indicated no adverse physiologic responses unique to this drug combination. All dogs exhibited relatively stable Spo₂ profiles for the duration of monitoring, with a mean (±SD) Spo₂ of 89% ± 4.9%. Yohimbine administration (2.5 mg i.v., 2.5 mg i.m. or s.c.) 30-37 min after darting provided effective reversal, with times to standing after yohimbine ranging from 2.0 to 10.2 min. All dogs appeared behaviorally normal and returned to their packs after the procedures.

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