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Persistent Right Aortic Arch and Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery in a White Bengal Tiger (Panthera Tigris)

Cornelia J. Ketz, MaryAnn Radlinsky, Laura Armbrust, James W. Carpenter and Ramiro Isaza
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Vol. 32, No. 2 (Jun., 2001), pp. 268-272
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20096111
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Persistent Right Aortic Arch and Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery in a White Bengal Tiger (Panthera Tigris)
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Abstract

A 3-mo-old male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) presented with the chief complaint of regurgitation of solid food since weaning at 2 mo of age. Compared with its littermates, the tiger was in poor body condition and weighed only 10.3 kg when its littermates were estimated at 20-25 kg. Thoracic radiographs showed a megaesophagus cranial to the heart base. A contrast esophagram more clearly outlined the megaesophagus, and fluoroscopy demonstrated normal motility of the caudal esophagus. Endoscopic examination revealed a structure coursing dorsally from right to left over the esophagus and a constrictive band on the left of the esophagus at the heart base. Nonselective angiography confirmed the presence of a persistent right aortic arch, as well as an aberrant left subclavian artery. A left fourth intercostal thoracotomy was performed, and the ligamentum arteriosum was double ligated and divided. The left subclavian artery did not cause significant compromise of the esophagus and was not manipulated at surgery. The tiger recovered well from anesthesia and surgery. Solid food was slowly introduced over a 2-mo period without any regurgitation. The cub gained weight rapidly after surgery.

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