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Paresis Secondary to an Extradural Hematoma in a Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae)

Cornelia J. Ketz-Riley, David S. Galloway, John P. Hoover, Mark C. Rochat, Robert J. Bahr, Jerry W. Ritchey and David L. Caudell
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Vol. 35, No. 2 (Jun., 2004), pp. 208-215
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20096331
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Paresis Secondary to an Extradural Hematoma in a Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae)
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Abstract

A 15-yr-old female Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) was presented to the Boren Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at Oklahoma State University with a 3-wk history of progressive hind limb weakness. Neurologic evaluation was limited to review of videotape that demonstrated weakness and ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits of the tiger's pelvic limbs. Spinal radiography demonstrated disc space narrowing, and myelography demonstrated a large extradural compressive lesion at the level of $\text{L}_{2-3}$. Computed tomography did not reveal bone involvement. Surgery was performed to decompress the spinal cord and obtain a definitive diagnosis. A right hemilaminectomy was performed after a dorsal approach to the lumbar spine. Histologic examination of the mass revealed a consolidated extradural spinal hematoma, presumed to be secondary to intervertebral disc herniation. Despite incomplete resection of the mass and plastic deformation of the spinal cord, the tiger returned to normal ambulation within 3 wk of surgical decompression.

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