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Ocular Chlamydiales Infections of Western Barred Bandicoots (Perameles bougainville) in Western Australia

Kristin Warren, Ralph Swan, Tracey Bodetti, Tony Friend, Stephanie Hill and Peter Timms
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Vol. 36, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 100-102
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20096420
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ocular Chlamydiales Infections of Western Barred Bandicoots (Perameles bougainville) in Western Australia
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Abstract

The western barred bandicoot (Perameles bougainville) is an endangered species, free ranging on only two islands off the coast of Western Australia (Dorre and Bernier Islands). Conservation efforts are currently directed at reintroducing these marsupials into predator-proof enclosures and habitats in historical distribution ranges on the mainland in the southwest of Western Australia and in South Australia. In September 2000, 19 western barred bandicoots were captured on Bernier Island for translocation, and 11 of these had evidence of at least one of the following eye conditions: corneal opacity, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, and blepharitis. Five bandicoots were examined, and conjunctival and cloacal swabs were collected. Polymerase chain reaction for Chlamydiales was positive in four bandicoots. Four Chlamydiales types were identified by gene sequencing, including a strain of Chlamydia pecorum different from strains previously found in koalas and several new Chlamydiales genotypes. The bandicoots responded excellently to treatment with oxytetracyline weekly for 6 wk, and topical oxytetracycline and neomycin were administered topically to both eyes s.i.d. for 4 mo.

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