Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Russia and the West: The Root of the Problem of Mutual Understanding

Marian Broda and E. M. Swiderski
Studies in East European Thought
Vol. 54, No. 1/2, Polish Studies on Russian Thought (Mar., 2002), pp. 7-24
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20099780
Page Count: 18
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Russia and the West: The Root of the Problem of Mutual Understanding
Preview not available

Abstract

I examine issues tied to the alleged difficulties of mutual understanding between Russia and the West. I show that some of the background to these issues lies in the difference of culturally grounded differences in perceptual and conceptual schemata. In the West, a broadly understood Aristotelianism and in Russia Neoplatonism designate dominant attitudes to the world. The Russian 'lunar' consciousness, in comparison with the 'solar' consciousness of the West, tends by and large precipitously to totalize the world, and the experienced multiplicity of the real is referred to its imagined center. The difference between Russia and the West, limited to some degree by mutual similarities, can become the basis of an axiological and intellectual dialogue important for one side and the other.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[7]
    [7]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24