Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria from a Hydrothermally Active Area on the Galapagos Rift

H. L. Ehrlich
Ecological Bulletins
No. 35, Environmental Biogeochemistry (1983), pp. 357-366
Published by: Oikos Editorial Office
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20112871
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($10.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria from a Hydrothermally Active Area on the Galapagos Rift
Preview not available

Abstract

Gram-negative, manganese-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from one of the hydrothermal vent areas on the Galapagos Rift. The bacteria were recovered from glass slides exposed at Mussel Bed Vent for 10 months and from periostracum of a mussel from this location. The bacteria oxidized $\text{Mn}^{2+}$ with an inducible enzyme system. Prior fixation of $\text{Mn}^{2+}$ to Mn(IV)-oxide was not required for oxidation to proceed. The oxidation was oxygen-dependent and inhibited by antimycin A, 2-n-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, azide, and cyanide. Also, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis at the expense of manganese oxidation was shown. These bacteria thus differ in two important respects from others previously isolated from ferromanganese nodules of marine origin in that the latter bacteria only oxidize $\text{Mn}^{2+}$ bound to Mn(IV)-oxide or other specific sorbent, with a constitutive instead of inducible manganese oxidase. At present there is no evidence that the bacteria from Mussel Bed Vent can grow autotrophically on manganese. They appear to be mixotrophs. They may contribute to the energy flow in the biotic zone of the geothermally active area.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
357
    357
  • Thumbnail: Page 
358
    358
  • Thumbnail: Page 
359
    359
  • Thumbnail: Page 
360
    360
  • Thumbnail: Page 
361
    361
  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366