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Analyticity without Synonymy in Simple Comparative Logic

Theodore J. Everett
Synthese
Vol. 130, No. 2 (Feb., 2002), pp. 303-315
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20117218
Page Count: 13
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Analyticity without Synonymy in Simple Comparative Logic
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Abstract

In this paper I provide some formal schemas for the analysis of vague predicates in terms of a set of semantic relations other than classical synonymy, including weak synonymy (as between "large" and "huge"), antonymy (as between "large" and "small"), relativity (as between "large" and "large for a dog"), and a kind of supervenience (as between "large" and "wide" or "long"). All of these relations are representable in the simple comparative logic CL, in accordance with the basic formula: the more something is F, the more (or less) it is G. I use Carnapian meaning postulates to define these relations as constraints on interpretations of the formal language of CL.

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