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Husserl and Schlick on the Logical Form of Experience

Paul Livingston
Synthese
Vol. 132, No. 3 (Sep., 2002), pp. 239-272
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20117281
Page Count: 34
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Husserl and Schlick on the Logical Form of Experience
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Abstract

Over a period of several decades spanning the origin of the Vienna Circle, Schlick repeatedly attacked Husserl's phenomenological method for its reliance on the ability to intuitively grasp or see essences. Aside from its significance for phenomenologists, the attack illuminates significant and little-explored tensions in the history of analytic philosophy as well. For after coming under the influence of Wittgenstein, Schlick proposed to replace Husserl's account of the epistemology of propositions describing the overall structure of experience with his own account based on the structure of language rather than on the intuition of essences. I discuss both philosophers' accounts of the epistemology of propositions describing the structure of experience. For both philosophers, this epistemology was closely related to the general epistemology of logic; nevertheless, neither philosopher had a completely coherent account of it. Comparison of the two approaches shows that perennial and severe theoretical obstacles stand in the way of giving an epistemology of the structure of experience, a central requirement for both philosophers' theories. Consideration of these obstacles sheds a new light on the reasons for the historically decisive split between the continental and the analytic traditions, as well as on the subsequent development of the analytic tradition away from the structural description of experience.

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