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Inner Light

Daniel Alroy
Synthese
Vol. 104, No. 1 (Jul., 1995), pp. 147-160
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20117420
Page Count: 14
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Inner Light
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Abstract

Neural impulses from the senses to the brain convey information, not sensation. The direct electrical stimulation of the cortex produces sensations. Hence, such sensations are evoked in the brain, and not received from the senses, nor from the outside world through the senses. More specifically, the experience of light is evoked in the brain and not received from the eyes. Consequently, the born blind, too, would experience light in response to electrical brain stimulation. The luminosity of light is not a property of electromagnetic radiation. If the experience of light is private, then so are the visual observations it makes possible.

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