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Convention and Language

Henry Jackman
Synthese
Vol. 117, No. 3 (1998/1999), pp. 295-312
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20118114
Page Count: 18
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Convention and Language
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Abstract

This paper has three objectives. The first is to show how David Lewis' influential account of how a population is related to its language requires that speakers be 'conceptually autonomous' in a way that is incompatible with content ascriptions following from the assumption that its speakers share a language. The second objective is to sketch an alternate account of the psychological and sociological facts that relate a population to its language. The third is to suggest a modification of Lewis' account of convention that will allow one to preserve the claim that there are conventions of language.

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