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Are Dispositions Causally Relevant?

Jennifer McKitrick
Synthese
Vol. 144, No. 3, Dispositions and Laws of Nature (Apr., 2005), pp. 357-371
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20118569
Page Count: 15
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Are Dispositions Causally Relevant?
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Abstract

To determine whether dispositions are causally relevant, we have to get clear about what causal relevance is. Several characteristics of causal relevance have been suggested, including Explanatory Power, Counterfactual Dependence, Lawfullness, Exclusion, Independence, and Minimal Sufficiency. Different accounts will yield different answers about the causal relevance of dispositions. However, accounts of causal relevance that are the most plausible, for independent reasons, render the verdict that dispositions are causally relevant.

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