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Skepticism, Contextualism, and Semantic Self-Knowledge

Ram Neta
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research
Vol. 67, No. 2 (Sep., 2003), pp. 396-411
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20140609
Page Count: 16
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Skepticism, Contextualism, and Semantic Self-Knowledge
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Abstract

Stephen Schiffer has argued that contextualist solutions to skepticism rest on an implausible "error theory" concerning our own semantic intentions. Similar arguments have recently been offered also by Thomas Hofweber and Patrick Rysiew. I attempt to show how contextualists can rebut these arguments. The kind of self-knowledge that contextualists are committed to denying us is not a kind of self-knowledge that we need, nor is it a kind of self-knowledge that we can plausibly be thought to possess.

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