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Race Socialization Messages across Historical Time

Tony N. Brown and Chase L. Lesane-Brown
Social Psychology Quarterly
Vol. 69, No. 2 (Jun., 2006), pp. 201-213
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20141738
Page Count: 13
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Race Socialization Messages across Historical Time
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Abstract

In this study we investigated whether the content of race socialization messages varied by birth cohort, using data from a national probability sample. Most respondents recalled receiving messages about what it means to be black from their parents or guardians; these messages were coded into five mutually exclusive content categories: individual pride, racial group pride, deference to and fear of whites, color-blind, and whites are prejudiced. We examined three birth cohorts: pre-"Brown v. Board of Education," protest, and post-protest. The content of messages varied significantly by cohort. For example, messages conveying deference to and fear of whites were more likely to be transmitted to children coming of age during the pre-"Brown v. Board of Education" era. We also found that respondents' current racial attitudes were correlated with messages they received during childhood.

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