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In vitro Propagation of Selected Sphagnum Species (Section Subsecunda)

Iwona Melosik and Sigurd M. Såstad
Lindbergia
Vol. 30, No. 1 (2005), pp. 21-31
Published by: Oikos Editorial Office
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20150177
Page Count: 11
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In vitro Propagation of Selected Sphagnum Species (Section Subsecunda)
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Abstract

Excised buds from capitula containing apical meristems were used as starting material to establish shoot-tip axenic cultures of four Sphagnum species from the section Subsecunda. To find optimum conditions for rapid production of clonal gametophores, the buds were grown in various media with and without an exogenous cytokinin (BAP) and vitamins. Time of inoculation, pH, and species' differences in capacity for regeneration, were found to be critical determinants of regeneration efficiency. In this study, the buds with the highest growth rates were regenerated from S. denticulatum, followed by S. inundatum. In comparison, S. subsecundum and particularly S. contortum showed a poor response with respect to bud regeneration and growth. The species exhibit markedly different responses to pH. The differences among species may be related to species' ploidy levels. The plant material produced in vitro might be used as an abundant source of contaminant-free DNA for genetic studies. The cultivation process strongly alters the morphology of the plants, therefore they cannot be directly used for comparative morphological studies but can be used in subsequent field experiments.

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