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The Contribution of Noninstructional Activities to College Classroom Teacher Effectiveness

Ronald D. McCullagh and Melvin R. Roy
The Journal of Experimental Education
Vol. 44, No. 1 (Fall, 1975), pp. 61-70
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20151066
Page Count: 10
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The Contribution of Noninstructional Activities to College Classroom Teacher Effectiveness
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Abstract

The contribution of noninstructional activities to classroom teacher effectiveness was investigated by administering a questionnaire to 52 university faculty members. The criterion for classroom effectiveness was a student evaluation of each teacher. A simple correlation analysis and the multiple regression technique were used to evaluate the results of this study. A significant result of the study was the failure of noninstructional activities to have predictive value when student-perceived teacher effectiveness is used as the criterion. A second significant result was the negative effect that time spent in consulting had upon classroom teacher effectiveness. Implications for further research are discussed, including the suggestion that a reevaluation of the responsibility of the university to the community, and of education to society, may be necessary.

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