Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Classroom Seating Choice and Teacher Perceptions of Students

John A. Daly and Amy Suite
The Journal of Experimental Education
Vol. 50, No. 2 (Winter, 1981/1982), pp. 64-69
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20151431
Page Count: 6
  • Download ($44.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Classroom Seating Choice and Teacher Perceptions of Students
Preview not available

Abstract

Based on research linking seating position to participation and achievement in classrooms this study investigated the impact of seat position on teachers' initial judgments of students. Teachers were presented with a seating chart where the student's chosen seat, sex, and grade were described. Teachers made evaluations on the basis of this information. Results indicated a significant effect for seating and a three-way interaction. Students sitting forward in the classroom are regarded more favorably than those sitting in the rear. Teachers regard males sitting in the rear and females sitting forward more positively in the early grades and less positively in the later grades than their counterparts. In addition, teacher social-communicative anxiety affects evaluations based upon seating choice. High-anxious teachers differentiate between students on the basis of seating significantly more than low-anxious teachers.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[64]
    [64]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69