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Variations in Trait-Anxiety and Achievement Motivation of College Students as a Function of Classroom Seating Position

James L. Rebeta, Charles I. Brooks, Jean P. O'Brien and George A. Hunter
The Journal of Experimental Education
Vol. 61, No. 3 (Spring, 1993), pp. 257-267
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20152376
Page Count: 11
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Variations in Trait-Anxiety and Achievement Motivation of College Students as a Function of Classroom Seating Position
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Abstract

In Experiment 1, college undergraduates were given three tests measuring state, trait, and text anxiety. The test scores were then analyzed according to which row in the classroom the students chose to sit in. The results showed no relationship between seating position and state- and test-anxiety scores. Trait-anxiety scores, however, significantly increased beyond the front row. Experiment 2 measured achievement motivation of college freshmen prior to their taking a course. Achievement scores were highest for students who subsequently selected seats in the front third of the room at the beginning of the course. Overall, the results show that personality traits are related to seating choice and that such traits may actually cause a student's choice.

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