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Predicting Academic Performance: The Impact of Expectancy and Needs Theory

Marshall A. Geiger and Elizabeth A. Cooper
The Journal of Experimental Education
Vol. 63, No. 3 (Spring, 1995), pp. 251-262
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20152454
Page Count: 12
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Predicting Academic Performance: The Impact of Expectancy and Needs Theory
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Abstract

Many approaches to the explanation/prediction of student performance have been presented in the literature. In this study, both expectancy theory and needs theory variables are used to predict college student performance--that is, overall GPA. The average valence variable from the expectancy theory model was found to be the best overall predictor of actual academic performance. Although exhibiting low internal reliability measures, need for autonomy scores were also found to be highly explanatory. Need for achievement was unexpectedly not a significant predictor of actual performance for this student group.

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