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Help a School Child Project: Tutoring Experiences in the Undergraduate Educational Psychology Course

Ronald N. Marso
The Journal of Experimental Education
Vol. 40, No. 1 (Fall, 1971), pp. 67-73
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20157242
Page Count: 7
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Help a School Child Project: Tutoring Experiences in the Undergraduate Educational Psychology Course
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Abstract

The hypothesis that turtoring experiences would make the undergraduate educational psychology course more meaningful for college students without a loss in traditional achievement was investigated. The thirty-four Ss in the project group volunteered to spend about two hours tutoring and two hours in class each week. The progress of this group was compared with the progress of students in the traditional sections who were exposed to the same tests, text, and instructor. The results suggested that; the tutoring group achieved as high in the traditional sense; the tutoring group significantly increased their attitude toward children and teaching; the tutoring group felt that both they and the children being tutored profited from their experiences; and that the cooperating teachers felt the project should be continued as their students profited from the tutoring.

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