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Effects of Dehydration and Exogenous Growth Regulators on Dormancy, Quiescence and Germination of Grape Somatic Embryos

D. J. Gray
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology
Vol. 25, No. 12 (Dec., 1989), pp. 1173-1178
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20171573
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Dehydration and Exogenous Growth Regulators on Dormancy, Quiescence and Germination of Grape Somatic Embryos
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Abstract

Dormant grape somatic embryos from five genetically distinct culture lines were subjected either to dehydration or exogenous growth regulators (benzyladenine, gibberellin or abscisic acid). Of growth regulator treatments tested, benzyladenine resulted in the highest germination rate but postgermination growth was abnormal. Abscisic acid treatment resulted in the least germination. Dehydration for 21 d under 75-95% relative humidity was effective only for the culture line that produced well developed embryos. However, for this line, more embryos produced shoots after dehydration (34%) when compared to growth regulator treatments and the postgermination growth resembled that of a seedling. Moisture content of dehydrated somatic embryos was similar to that of seed at equivalent relative humidities. Because dehydrated embryos germinate after addition of water, they are considered to be quiescent or nondormant. Plant recovery rates of 34% after 21 d of dehydrated storage at 70% relative humidity suggests that dehydration of somatic embryos may eventually provide for the conservation of clonally propagated crops in seed gene banks.

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