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Parental School Involvement and Children's Academic Achievement: Pragmatics and Issues

Nancy E. Hill and Lorraine C. Taylor
Current Directions in Psychological Science
Vol. 13, No. 4 (Aug., 2004), pp. 161-164
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20182940
Page Count: 4
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Parental School Involvement and Children's Academic Achievement: Pragmatics and Issues
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Abstract

Developing collaborations between families and schools to promote academic success has a long-standing basis in research and is the focus of numerous programs and policies. We outline some of the mechanisms through which parental school involvement affects achievement and identify how patterns and amounts of involvement vary across cultural, economic, and community contexts and across developmental levels. We propose next steps for research, focusing on the importance of considering students' developmental stages, the context in which involvement takes place, and the multiple perspectives through which involvement may be assessed. Finally, we discuss enhancing involvement in diverse situations.

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