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Forensic Developmental Psychology: Unveiling Four Common Misconceptions

Maggie Bruck and Stephen Ceci
Current Directions in Psychological Science
Vol. 13, No. 6 (Dec., 2004), pp. 229-232
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20182963
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Forensic Developmental Psychology: Unveiling Four Common Misconceptions
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Abstract

We summarize recent developments in the field of forensic developmental psychology that challenge traditional conceptions about the reliability of children's reports. The areas covered involve the disclosure patterns of sexually abused children, the nature of suggestive interviews, developmental differences in suggestibility, and the amount of suggestion required to produce false reports and beliefs.

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