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Ever-Smoking, Quitting, and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence from the Durham, North Carolina, Epidemiologic Catchment Area

Lirio S. Covey, Dana C. Hughes, Alexander H. Glassman, Dan G. Blazer and Linda K. George
Tobacco Control
Vol. 3, No. 3 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 222-227
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20207059
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ever-Smoking, Quitting, and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence from the Durham, North Carolina, Epidemiologic Catchment Area
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Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between cigarette smoking and psychiatric disorders. Design: The relationship between 11 psychiatric disorders and both ever-smoking and quitting or reducing smoking was determined by odds ratio analysis. Statistical adjustment was employed to control for the influence of comorbidity among "smoking-related" psychiatric disorders as well as age, race, education, and urban vs rural residence. Outcome measures: Ever-smoking -- a history of smoking at least one cigarette a day for one month or more. Quit/cut down -- made a cessation attempt and succeeded in smoking less than 10 cigarettes a day for at least 12 months. Participants: 2980 individuals from the Durham, North Carolina (USA) epidemiologic catchment area interviewed in 1981-83. Results: A history of ever-smoking was associated with alcohol abuse/-dependence and generalized anxiety disorder among men and women. Men with generalized anxiety disorder and women with recurrent-episode major depression showed a decreased likelihood of quitting or cutting down. A weak association was observed between ever-smoking and single-episode major depression in both genders. There was no excess of ever-smokers among individuals with schizophrenia but the quit rate in this group was nil. Conclusion: Significant associations between certain psychiatric disorders and cigarette smoking behaviour exist. These associations provide clues for developing smoking control interventions tailored to the presence of those disorders and contribute as well towards improved management of smoking-related psychiatric disorders.

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