Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Patterns of Smoking in Bulgaria

Dina Balabanova, Martin Bobak and Martin McKee
Tobacco Control
Vol. 7, No. 4 (Winter, 1998), pp. 383-385
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20207563
Page Count: 3
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Patterns of Smoking in Bulgaria
Preview not available

Abstract

Background: Although the rate of smoking-related deaths in Bulgaria is still relatively low, in international terms, it has been rising rapidly. This is likely to become worse in the future as Bulgaria faces growing pressure from transnational tobacco companies. There is, however, little information on patterns of smoking, which is necessary for development of effective policies to tackle tobacco consumption. Objective: To describe the pattern of smoking in Bulgaria and its relationship with sociodemographic factors. Design: Multivariate analysis of data on patterns of tobacco consumption from a multi-stage nationwide survey of 1550 adults. Setting: Bulgaria, in 1997. Main outcome measure: Prevalence of current cigarette smoking. Results: 38.4% of men and 16.7% of women smoke. Smoking rates are strongly associated with age, with 58% of men and 30% of women aged 30-39 smoking whereas only 5% of men aged 70 years and older and almost no women of this age smoke. Smoking is more common in cities, among those who are widowed or divorced, or who do not own their home. There is no clear association with household income or, for men, with education, although there is a suggestion that smoking may be more common among more highly educated women. Conclusions: The observed pattern of smoking indicates the need for a robust policy to tackle smoking in Bulgaria, especially among the young in large cities, informed by a better understanding of why smoking rates vary among different groups.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
383
    383
  • Thumbnail: Page 
384
    384
  • Thumbnail: Page 
385
    385