Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Grasses in Ancient Egypt

Loutfy Boulos and Ahmed Gamal-El-Din Fahmy
Kew Bulletin
Vol. 62, No. 3 (2007), pp. 507-511
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20443376
Page Count: 5

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Ancient Egypt, Barley, Archaeological sites, Sorghum, Plants, Playas, Crops, Weeds, Deserts, Grasses
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Grasses in Ancient Egypt
Preview not available

Abstract

The grass species played an important role in the daily life and economy of ancient Egypt. Cereals: wheat and barley have been cultivated since time immemorial, the earliest finds date back to 7300-6000 BP. They were used in ancient Egypt for making bread and for brewing. Reeds: Phragmites australis, Arundo donax and Saccharum spontaneum were used for making baskets, mats, nets, pens and arrows, and as building material. The rhizomes of Phragmites were used in popular medicine and the panicle as a Hieroglyphic sign that appears on old monuments. Reeds were also used in ancient architecture as a motif for columns. Halfa grasses (Desmostachya bipinnata and Imperata cylindrica) were used for making sandals, brooms, ropes, bags, brushes, necklaces and other objects. Among the weeds identified from plant remains excavated from ancient sites are: Echinochloa colona, Brachiaria sp., Digitaria sp., Setaria sp., Urochloa sp. and other Paniceae species. The desert grass Panicum turgidum has also been identified among the plant remains. A list of grasses known from ancient Egypt is provided.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510
  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511