If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Catholic Guilt among U.S. Teenagers: A Research Note

Stephen Vaisey and Christian Smith
Review of Religious Research
Vol. 49, No. 4 (Jun., 2008), pp. 415-426
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20447515
Page Count: 12
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Catholic Guilt among U.S. Teenagers: A Research Note
Preview not available

Abstract

"Catholic guilt" is an idea deeply embedded in U.S. popular religious culture. Few empirical studies, however, have investigated the actual extent of Catholic guilt among adherents of Catholicism. The findings of the little relevant research that exists are also inconclusive and difficult to generalize. This study uses data from the National Study of Youth and Religion to investigate the extent of possible Catholic guilt among U.S. adolescents ages 13 to 17, testing 15 distinct hypotheses. Findings reveal no evidence of Catholic guilt in this population with one exception--compared to other religious traditions, Catholicism appears to both cause and relieve less guilt among U.S. teenagers. There is no evidence, however, that Catholics feel more guilty than other teens, that more observant Catholics feel more guilty than less observant ones, nor that guilt-inducing behaviors affect Catholics more strongly than other teens.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
415
    415
  • Thumbnail: Page 
416
    416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418
  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426