Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Wintering Distributions and Migration of Saltmarsh and Nelson's Sharp-Tailed Sparrows

Jon S. Greenlaw and Glen E. Woolfenden
The Wilson Journal of Ornithology
Vol. 119, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 361-377
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20456021
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Wintering Distributions and Migration of Saltmarsh and Nelson's Sharp-Tailed Sparrows
Preview not available

Abstract

We delineate the winter distributions of the five subspecies of Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson's Sharp-tailed (A. nelsoni) sparrows, and comment on patterns of migration. The two subspecies of A. caudacutus (A. c. caudacutus, A. c. diversus) have similar core winter ranges that extend along the Atlantic coast from North Carolina to northeastern Florida. They also occupy two isolated areas within peninsular Florida in Everglades National Park and on the northwest Gulf coast. Migration in A. caudacutus is mainly confined to the coast. The subspecies of A. nelsoni (A. n. nelsoni, A. n. alterus, A. n. subvirgatus) occupy different but overlapping winter ranges. A. n. nelsoni is the most widespread, occurring from North Carolina to Texas. Some birds migrate along the Atlantic coast southwards in fall, and others follow interior routes through the Mississippi River watershed in both fall and spring. We suggest A. n. nelsoni wintering along the Atlantic coast in spring fly directly inland towards their northern breeding areas. Some birds in fall also approach the southeastern coastline directly across the Appalachian Mountains. A. n. alterus mainly winters along the southeastern Atlantic coast to Florida, and in fewer numbers along the Gulf coast at least to Louisiana. Some A. n. alterus may migrate to the Gulf coast directly via inland routes west of the Appalachian Mountains. A. n. subvirgatus has the most limited wintering distribution, from South Carolina to northeast Florida, and is strictly a coastal migrant south of New England. Limited wintering ranges and narrow winter habitat requirements place continental populations of sharp-tailed sparrows at risk.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
361
    361
  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366
  • Thumbnail: Page 
367
    367
  • Thumbnail: Page 
368
    368
  • Thumbnail: Page 
369
    369
  • Thumbnail: Page 
370
    370
  • Thumbnail: Page 
371
    371
  • Thumbnail: Page 
372
    372
  • Thumbnail: Page 
373
    373
  • Thumbnail: Page 
374
    374
  • Thumbnail: Page 
375
    375
  • Thumbnail: Page 
376
    376
  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377