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First Description of the Breeding Biology and Natural History of the Ochre-Breasted Brush Finch (Atlapetes semirufus) in Venezuela

Luis Biancucci and Thomas E. Martin
The Wilson Journal of Ornithology
Vol. 120, No. 4 (Dec., 2008), pp. 856-862
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20456246
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
First Description of the Breeding Biology and Natural History of the Ochre-Breasted Brush Finch (Atlapetes semirufus) in Venezuela
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Abstract

We provide the first description of the eggs, breeding biology, and natural history of the Ochre-breasted Brush Finch (Atlapetes semirufus). We found 37 nests over four breeding seasons (2004-2007) in Yacambú National Park, Venezuela. Nesting activity started in late April and continued until early June suggesting single-brooded behavior despite a typical tropical clutch size of two eggs (x̄ = 1.89) that were laid on consecutive days. Egg mass averaged 3.38 g and 11.6% of adult female mass. The incubation and nestling periods averaged 14.9 and 10.5 days, respectively. Only females incubated and the percent time they spent incubating did not change between early and late incubation. Females brooded 42.7% of the time when nestlings were 2 days of age and 20.5% when 9 days of age. Both parents provisioned young at a low rate (3.9 trips/hr) and nestling growth rate (k = 0.45) was also slow. Nest predation rates were relatively high with daily mortality rates of 0.058 and 0.067 during incubation and nestling stages, respectively.

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