Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Balancing Newton's Mind: His Singular Behaviour and His Madness of 1692-93

Milo Keynes
Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
Vol. 62, No. 3 (Sep. 20, 2008), pp. 289-300
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20462679
Page Count: 12
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Balancing Newton's Mind: His Singular Behaviour and His Madness of 1692-93
Preview not available

Abstract

Newton grew up with a vulnerable and eccentric character besides having a low self-esteem, and he was someone who only uncommonly developed any close relationships. On review it is argued that his distrust and suspicions of others, and the fear that he might be harmed by criticism and his discoveries stolen, followed from his mother's separation from him in childhood and not, as has been claimed, from the developmental disorder of Asperger's syndrome. It is further firmly argued that his 'madness' of 1692 and 1693 was due to mercury poisoning from his alchemical experiments and not to clinical depression.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
289
    289
  • Thumbnail: Page 
290
    290
  • Thumbnail: Page 
291
    291
  • Thumbnail: Page 
292
    292
  • Thumbnail: Page 
293
    293
  • Thumbnail: Page 
294
    294
  • Thumbnail: Page 
295
    295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
296
    296
  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300