Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Leslie Norris and Exile

James Prothero
Rocky Mountain Review
Vol. 62, No. 1 (Spring, 2008), pp. 45-48
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20479489
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($8.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Leslie Norris and Exile
Preview not available

Abstract

Less than two years after his death, the books of Welsh poet and resident of Utah, Leslie Norris, are close to going out of print. Norris' powerful and Romantic poetry and short stories do not deserve such a fate. Like Robert Frost, Norris found his poetic voice in exile. Norris left a successful teaching career in Britain in middle age to focus his life on being a poet. After a series of one-year appointments as writer in residence, his Brigham Young University job became permanent and allowed him to develop a voice that at once is full of the imagery of his Welsh past and of his adopted Mountain West home. This essay argues that exile and the sense of exile are quintessential American traits, and thus that Norris had unwittingly become a distinctly American poet. His work resonates with the nature writing coming out of the West in the late 20th century. Norris is one of the finest voices in Welsh and American literature and should not be consigned to literary oblivion.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48