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The Biology, Ecology and Future Conservation of Twaite Shad (Alosa fallax Lacépède), Allis Shad (Alosa alosa L.) and Killarney Shad (Alosa fallax killarnensis Tate Regan) in Ireland

D. Doherty, N. O'Maoiléidigh and T. K. McCarthy
Biology and Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy
Vol. 104B, No. 3, Threatened Irish Freshwater Fishes (Dec., 2004), pp. 93-102
Published by: Royal Irish Academy
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20500228
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Biology, Ecology and Future Conservation of Twaite Shad (Alosa fallax Lacépède), Allis Shad (Alosa alosa L.) and Killarney Shad (Alosa fallax killarnensis Tate Regan) in Ireland
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Abstract

Anadromous twaite shad (Alosa fallax Lacépède) and allis shad (Alosa alosa L.) occur in Irish coastal waters, although only twaite shad has been confirmed to reproduce in Ireland. A landlocked subspecies of the twaite shad, known as the Killarney shad (Alosa fallax killarnensis), occurs in Lough Leane in south-western Ireland. Relatively little scientific research has been undertaken on the marine phases of these species in Ireland except for occasional reports of coastal bycatch. The growth, diet and parasite assemblages of twaite and allis shad sampled from Waterford Estuary and the upper tidal reaches of the River Barrow have been investigated since 1995. Similarly, aspects of the Killarney shad have been investigated since 1986. The number of gill rakers or general body size easily separates these subspecies of shad. The perceived threats to the twaite, Killarney and allis shad in Ireland, where they have been categorised as 'vulnerable' to extinction (twaite shad) and 'endangered' (Killarney and allis shad), are listed and discussed.

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