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Pregnancy Outcome in Women before and after Cervical Conisation: Population Based Cohort Study

Susanne Albrechtsen, Svein Rasmussen, Steinar Thoresen, Lorentz M. Irgens, Ole Erik Iversen, Jakobsson and Bruinsma
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 337, No. 7673 (Oct. 4, 2008), pp. 803-805
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20511012
Page Count: 3
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Pregnancy Outcome in Women before and after Cervical Conisation: Population Based Cohort Study
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Abstract

Objectives: To examine the consequences of cervical conisation in terms of adverse outcome in subsequent pregnancies. Design: Population based cohort study. Data sources: Data on cervical conisation derived from the Cancer Registry of Norway and on pregnancy outcome from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, 1967-2003. 15 108 births occurred in women who had previously undergone cervical conisation and 57 136 who subsequently underwent cervical conisation. In the same period there were 2 164 006 births to women who had not undergone relevant treatment (control). Results: The proportion of preterm delivery was 17.2% in women who gave birth after cervical conisation versus 6.7% in women who gave birth before cervical conisation and 6.2% in women who had not undergone cervical conisation. The relative risk of a late abortion (<24 weeks' gestation) was 4.0 (95% confidence interval 3.3 to 4.8) in women who gave birth after cervical conisation compared with no cervical conisation. The relative risk of delivery was 4.4 (3.8 to 5.0) at 24-27 weeks, 3.4 (3.1 to 3.7) at 28-32 weeks, and 2.5 (2.4 to 2.6) at 33-36 weeks. The relative risk of preterm delivery declined during the study period and especially of delivery before 28 weeks' gestation. Conclusion: Cervical conisation influences outcome in subsequent pregnancies in terms of an increased risk of preterm delivery, especially in the early gestational age groups in which the clinical significance is highest. A careful clinical approach should be taken in the selection of women for cervical conisation and in the clinical care of pregnancies after a cervical conisation.

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