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Journal Article

Abuse of People with Dementia by Family Carers: Representative Cross Sectional Survey

Claudia Cooper, Amber Selwood, Martin Blanchard, Zuzana Walker, Robert Blizard and Gill Livingston
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 338, No. 7694 (Mar. 7, 2009), pp. 583-586
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20512272
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Abuse of People with Dementia by Family Carers:
                            Representative Cross Sectional Survey
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Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of abusive behaviours by family carers of people with dementia. Design: Representative cross sectional survey. Setting: Community mental health teams in Essex and London. Participants: 220 family carers of people newly referred to secondary psychiatric services with dementia who were living at home. Main outcome measure: Psychological and physical abuse (revised modified conflict tactics scale). Results: 115 (52%, 95% confidence interval 46% to 59%) carers reported some abusive behaviour and 74 (34%, 27% to 40%) reported important levels of abuse. Verbal abuse was most commonly reported. Only three (1.4%) carers reported occasional physical abuse. Conclusions: Abusive behaviour by family carers towards people with dementia is common, with a third reporting important levels of abuse and half some abusive behaviour. We found few cases of physical or frequent abuse, although those with the most abusive behaviour may have been reluctant to report it.

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