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Littoral and Benthic Investigations on the West Coast of Ireland: V (Section A: Faunistic and Ecological Studies). A Contribution to the Biology of the Leopardspotted Goby, Thorogobius ephippiatus (Lowe) (Pisces: Teleostei: Gobiidae)

James Dunne
Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy. Section B: Biological, Geological, and Chemical Science
Vol. 76 (1976), pp. 121-132
Published by: Royal Irish Academy
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20519008
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Littoral and Benthic Investigations on the West Coast of Ireland: V (Section A: Faunistic and Ecological Studies). A Contribution to the Biology of the Leopardspotted Goby, Thorogobius ephippiatus (Lowe) (Pisces: Teleostei: Gobiidae)
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Abstract

Fifty-nine specimens of the leopard-spotted goby, T. ephippiatus (Lowe), were taken in Killary Bay and in Kilkieran Bay (Connemara), Co. Galway. The fish inhabits sub-marine rock and cliff areas. Its diet is varied but consists mainly of polychaetes, crustaceans and molluscs. Growth continues for at least seven years; initial growth is fast but tends to slow down in later years. The male fish grows slightly more rapidly than the female. Maturity is reached during the third and fourth years and the number of eggs produced increases with fish size. There is, however, variation in number at any particular size. Some meristic characters are similar to a Scottish population but other characters resemble those of a more southerly placed population.

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