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ASEAN Economic Development: An Analytical Survey--The State of the Field

Hal Hill
The Journal of Asian Studies
Vol. 53, No. 3 (Aug., 1994), pp. 832-866
DOI: 10.2307/2059732
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2059732
Page Count: 35
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
ASEAN Economic Development: An Analytical Survey--The State of the Field
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Abstract

In the first of a new series of "state-of-the-field" articles about Southeast Asia, HAL HILL documents the mechanics of rapid socioeconomic development in the six states that compose the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand). Hill concludes that Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand have exceptional records, while Indonesia's achievements are more modest; the Philippines are cast as the under-performing member within the group. Hill finds the outward-looking economic stance of the six states, which stops short of free trade, has been a vital factor and emphasizes the large but changing role that international trade and investment have played in the region's development over the past quarter century. In discussing the question of poverty, Hill concludes that in comparison with other regions, such as Latin America, the region's record on the incidence and reduction of poverty must be considered good. Overall, he does not find evidence that state intervention at the micro-level in the development process has been a major contributing factor, but does applaud ASEAN governments for their "resilience, flexibility, firmness, and pragmatism" in macroeconomic policy.

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