Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Increase in Natural Fertility During the Early Stages of Modernization: Canadian Indians Case Study

A. Romaniuk
Demography
Vol. 18, No. 2 (May, 1981), pp. 157-172
Published by: Springer on behalf of the Population Association of America
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2061090
Page Count: 16
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Increase in Natural Fertility During the Early Stages of Modernization: Canadian Indians Case Study
Preview not available

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that populations may experience an increase in their natural fertility during the early stages of modernization as a result of the relaxation of various fertility-inhibiting practices and customs prevalent in traditional societies. This article offers evidence of such an increase in natural fertility among Canadian Indians. The main underlying cause is found to be in the massive, almost abrupt, shift from prolonged breastfeeding to bottlefeeding which took place prior to the onset of large-scale birth control practices among Canadian Indians.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171
  • Thumbnail: Page 
172
    172