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Patterns and Determinants of Infant Mortality in Developed Nations, 1950- 1975

Fred C. Pampel, Jr. and Vijayan K. Pillai
Demography
Vol. 23, No. 4 (Nov., 1986), pp. 525-542
Published by: Springer on behalf of the Population Association of America
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2061349
Page Count: 18
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Patterns and Determinants of Infant Mortality in Developed Nations, 1950- 1975
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Abstract

The United States' rank on infant mortality falls well below what its level of national income would predict. This suggests that standard economic development and demographic explanations of infant mortality may not apply to developed nations. Using data for 18 industrial countries, we test the validity of standard explanations (national product, urbanization, fertility decline, female education, medical care) and alternative explanations (income inequality, population heterogeneity, welfare and medical expenditures, problems of the modern health care system). Overall, the results show strong support for standard explanations and show that the United States' position is associated with high teenage fertility, unemployment, ethnic diversity, and few hospital beds.

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