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Marital Status and Mortality: The Role of Health

Lee A. Lillard and Constantijn W. A. Panis
Demography
Vol. 33, No. 3 (Aug., 1996), pp. 313-327
Published by: Springer on behalf of the Population Association of America
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2061764
Page Count: 15
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Marital Status and Mortality: The Role of Health
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Abstract

Prior literature has shown that married men live longer than unmarried men. Possible explanations are that marriage protects its incumbents or that healthier men select themselves into marriage. Protective effects, however, introduce the possibility of adverse selection: Those in poor health have an incentive to marry. In this paper we explore the role of health in explaining mortality and marriage patterns, and distinguish protective effects from two types of selection effects. We find adverse selection on the basis of health (unhealthy men tend to (re)marry sooner) and positive selection on the basis of unmeasured factors that both promote good health and encourage marriage.

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