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Defeating Bigenderism: Changing Gender Assumptions in the Twenty-First Century

Miqqi Alicia Gilbert
Hypatia
Vol. 24, No. 3, Transgender Studies and Feminism: Theory, Politics, and Gendered Realities (Summer, 2009), pp. 93-112
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Hypatia, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20618166
Page Count: 20
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Defeating Bigenderism: Changing Gender Assumptions in the Twenty-First Century
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Abstract

Bigenderism maintains there are only two genders, which correspond with the two sexes, male and female. Basic bigenderism requires that legal documents and public institutions designate a single invariant gender (that is, sex). Strict bigenderism applies these categories in a social context that stigmatizes "imperfect" men and women who do not reach ideals set by the bigenderist schema. I discuss these concepts and their implications, present three models that successively weaken bigenderist assumptions, and argue for the most radical of the three.

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