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La sociedad de la información

Emilio Fontela
Política Exterior
Vol. 5, No. 21 (Summer, 1991), pp. 147-156
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20643124
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
La sociedad de la información
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Abstract

Japan exploited its time-honoured insularity in order to reach the position of supreme economic power that it undoubtedly holds today. After all, in Japan's developing industry, protectionism found its keenest exponent. But now, for the first time in its history, Japan contemplates a world in which its islands are not culturally marginalised, for economic imperatives have brought political and social openings in their trail. It is probable, in Emilio Fontela's opinion, that the European Act of Union precipitated Japanese efforts to internationalise its economic endeavours, for Japanese businessmen were hounded by an ill-conceived spectacle of "Fortress Europe" protected from Japanese competition. Japan now has two chief objectives: to promote the growth of internal consumption and to give momentum to the internationalization of the economy, taking into account the planet's ecological predicament. Militarily, Japan is unfurling a world strategy, moving progressively from bilateralism with the US to trilateralism, thus accepting a common destiny with Europe, but with its ultimate sights on multilateralism as a means of assessing global problems.

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