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DOING, UNDOING, OR REDOING GENDER? Learning from the Workplace Experiences of Transpeople

CATHERINE CONNELL
Gender and Society
Vol. 24, No. 1 (February 2010), pp. 31-55
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20676845
Page Count: 25
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
DOING, UNDOING, OR REDOING GENDER? Learning from the Workplace Experiences of Transpeople
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Abstract

Drawing from the perspectives of transgender individuals, this article offers an empirical investigation of recent critiques of West and Zimmerman's "doing gender" theory. This analysis uses 19 in-depth interviews with transpeople about their negotiation and management of gendered interactions at work to explore how their experiences potentially contribute to the doing, undoing, or redoing of gender in the workplace. I find that transpeople face unique challenges in making interactional sense of their sex, gender, and sex category and simultaneously engage in doing, undoing, and redoing gender in the process of managing these challenges. Consequently, I argue that their interactional gender accomplishments are not adequately captured under the rubric of "doing gender" and suggest instead that they be understood as "doing transgender." This article outlines the process of and consequences of "doing transgender" and its potential implications for the experience of and transformation of gender inequality at work.

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