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AN INSIGHT INTO THE IMPACT OF ARABLE FARMING ON IRISH BIODIVERSITY: A SCARCITY OF STUDIES HINDERS A RIGOROUS ASSESSMENT

Martin O'Brien, Charles Spillane, Conor Meade and Ewen Mullins
Biology and Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy
Vol. 108B, No. 2 (September 2008), pp. 97-108
Published by: Royal Irish Academy
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20694854
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
AN INSIGHT INTO THE IMPACT OF ARABLE FARMING ON IRISH BIODIVERSITY: A SCARCITY OF STUDIES HINDERS A RIGOROUS ASSESSMENT
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Abstract

To help understand and counteract future agronomic challenges to farmland biodiversity, it is essential to know how present farming practices have affected biodiversity on Irish farms. We present an overview of existing research data and conclusions, describing the impact of crop cultivation on biodiversity on Irish arable farms. An extensive literature review clearly indicates that peer-reviewed publications on research conducted in Ireland on this topic are quite scarce: just 21 papers investigating the effect of conventional crop cultivation on Irish biodiversity have been published within the past 30 years. Principally, these studies have concluded that conventional crop cultivation has had an adverse impact on biodiversity on Irish farms, with 15 of the 21 studies demonstrating negative trends for the taxa investigated. Compared to other EU states, the relative dearth of baseline data and absence of monitoring programmes designed to assess the specific impacts of crop cultivation on Irish biodiversity highlight the need to develop long-term research studies. With many new challenges facing Irish agriculture, a research programme must be initiated to measure current levels of biodiversity on arable land and to assess the main farming 'pressures' causing significant biodiversity loss or gains in these systems.

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