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IDENTITIES, TRADITIONS, AND DIVERSITY IN CAHOKIA'S UPLANDS

Susan M. Alt
Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology
Vol. 27, No. 2, Cahokia 2002: Diversity, Complexity, and History (Fall, 2002), pp. 217-235
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20708178
Page Count: 19
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IDENTITIES, TRADITIONS, AND DIVERSITY IN CAHOKIA'S UPLANDS
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Abstract

In the last five years, the Richland Archaeological Project has excavated several sites in what is called the Richland complex. The sites lie 15-40 km southeast of Cahokia. Their excavation has greatly increased information about people, places, and events at the time of the rise of Cahokia. These sites exhibit much more variability in terms of differences from and similarities to settlements in and around Cahokia than previous models of Mississippianization have suggested. Embedded in these differences and similarities are clues as to how people negotiated community relationships and identities in a rapidly changing social and political landscape. These communities also offer insights into the development of Cahokia itself.

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