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The Real- Time Global Supply Chain Game: New Educational Tool for Developing Supply Chain Management Professionals

THOMAS M. CORSI, SANDOR BOYSON, ALEXANDER VERBRAECK, STIJN-PIETER VAN HOUTEN, CHAODONG HAN and JOHN R. MACDONALD
Transportation Journal
Vol. 45, No. 3 (SUMMER 2006), pp. 61-73
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20713644
Page Count: 13
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The Real- Time Global Supply Chain Game: New Educational Tool for Developing Supply Chain Management Professionals
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Abstract

Researchers at Delft University and the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland have developed the "Global Supply Chain Game" (GSCG). A specific instance of the game is called the "Distributor Game," centered on globalization and the real-time supply chain. The GSCG differs from many existing business learning games in that, as opposed to being turn-based and locked in on demonstrating a single phenomenon (i.e., the bullwhip effect), it simulates a real-world experience by operating on a continuous clock with ongoing events and responses to individual decisions. The decision-making processes of the distributors in the game are controlled by human players. To confront the human players with a complex and dynamic environment, suppliers, markets, and competing distribution centers are represented by computer-controlled actors. The Distributor Game has been tested at the Robert H. Smith School of Business in seven courses since January 2005. The beta-tests include four MBA classes, two Executive MBA classes, and a single undergraduate class. Each class has been consistent in its approval of the game as a tool in simulating the complexities of a global supply chain and facilitating learning about how to successfully manage this environment.

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