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The Presentation and Reconstruction of Art in Advertising: A Content Analysis, A Survey of Creatives and a General Public Survey

Amir Hetsroni
Visual Arts Research
Vol. 31, No. 2 (2005), pp. 38-56
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20715383
Page Count: 19
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Presentation and Reconstruction of Art in Advertising: A Content Analysis, A Survey of Creatives and a General Public Survey
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Abstract

This study examines the presentation of fine art in advertising through a content analysis of print advertisements that show works of art, and uses information from surveys performed on the general public and on advertising creatives to check the extent of stylistic similarity between works of art that most frequently appear in advertisements and works of art that are most popular in the eyes of the general public and in the eyes of advertising creatives. Advertisements that show works of art tend to use a soft-sell approach and emphasize prestige. The predominant artistic style that is featured in these advertisements is classical and, in particular, Renaissance. However, in over half of the cases, the advertisements alter the appearance of works of art and reconstruct them in some way. Classical art, and especially Renaissance, is also most highly favored in the eyes of the general public, and particularly in the eyes of people who have no first-hand experience with art. The creatives' personal taste leans towards modern art, but from a professional perspective, they agree that classical art is more suitable for advertisements. A closer reading of selected advertisements illustrates the statistical findings.

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